0

Fantasia Film Fest 2012: Canadian Picks Announced

Fantasia is just around the corner, and they’ve just announced their schedule for 2012, including more than a dozen new Canadian genre films, plus a very special project that we’re sponsoring this year. Here’s our guide to getting the biggest local bang for your Loonie.

Events

If They Came from Within: An Alternative History of Canadian Horror
Canuxploitation.com is a proud sponsor of the debut of this special all-star touring art show organized by Rue Morgue Magazine editor-in-chief Dave Alexander. The show brings together some of Canada and Quebec’s most celebrated genre filmmakers with some of the country’s best designers and illustrators to create a gallery of poster art for Maple Syrup genre films that don’t exist. Participating filmmakers include Jason Eisener, Vincenzo Natali, Maurice Devereaux,  Bruce McDonald and author Tony Burgess, Lee Demarbre, Eric Tessier, Karim Hussain, Astron-6, Rodrigo Gudiño, George Mihalka, Brett Kelly and Donna Davis and the show will feature original art created by: Rupert Bottenberg, Angus Byers, Donald Caron, Jason Edmiston, Justin Erickson, Vincent Marconi, Matthew Marigold, Richard Patmore, Martin Plante, Ghoulish Gary Pullin, Paige Reynolds, Eric Robillard, whatisadam, Mark Unterberger, Beeforeo and James White.

FILMS

A LITTLE BIT ZOMBIE
Casey Walker’s romantic zombie comedy in which a groom-to-be is infected via a mosquito-borne outbreak (Quebec Premiere).

COLD BLOODED
In Jason Lapeyre’s crime drama, a female police officer has to keep a prisoner from escaping a nearly abandoned hospital unit at the same time his violent partners come looking for him (Quebec Premiere).

COLOMBARIUM
David Boutin and Maxime Dumontier star as a pair of estranged brothers who exorcise their family demons while forced to spend a week together as a condition to an inheritance (World Premiere).

EDDIE: THE SLEEPWALKING CANNIBAL
Boris Rodriguez’ Denmark/Canada co-production is a dark comedy about a painter who rediscovers inspiration when he befriends a sleepwalking cannibal,starring Thure Lindhardt, Georgina Reill and Stephen McHattie (Canadian Premiere).

HEMORRHAGE
Braden Croft takes viewers inside the mind of a serial killer who desperately wants to be a good person  (Quebec Premiere).

LLOYD THE CONQUEROR
In Michael Peterson’s LARPing comedy, three male college students do battle against Derek the Unholy, a dark wizard determined to hold onto his title as champion of the LARPers (Quebec Premiere),

LOWLIFE
Seth Smith’s hallucinatory tale of a lonely musician’s descent into the shadowy world of a living drug leads to a mysterious island where a battle of body and soul is waged (World Premiere).

MANBORG
Astron-6 returns in this sci-fi/horror outing featuring a motley pack of misfits defending Earth against Count Draculon’s robo-Nazivampires from Hell (Quebec Premiere).

MON AMI
Rob Grant’s (YESTERDAY)  blood-soaked comedy about two friends whose “‘get-rich-quick” plan to kidnap their boss’s daughter goes awry (World Premiere).

REPLICAS
Selma Blair, Josh Close and Rachel Miner star in Jeremy Power Regimbal’s home invasion thriller, in which a family’s cottage vacation is violently interrupted by a killers in search of the “perfect” life (Canadian Premiere).

ROLLER TOWN
Andrew Bush’s comedy with East coast troupe Picnicface has one man taking back his roller-skating-obsessed town from video game shilling gangsters (Quebec Premiere).

THE SUNFLOWER HOUR
A porn producer tries his hand at producing a children’s puppet show in Aaron Houston’s mockumentary (Montreal Premiere).

THE TALL MAN
When her child goes missing, a mother looks to unravel the legend of the Tall Man, an entity who allegedly abducts children in Pascal Laugier’s horror tale (Canadian Premiere).

0

RIP Ernest Borgnine

Canuxplotiation was saddened to learn of the death of Ernest Borgnine this past weekend. Although the always respectable Mr. Borgnine was well known for his high profile roles in some of cinema history’s greatest classics, he was also incredibly prolific. Little surprise then that, like many of his contemporaries, he made his way north of the border during the tax shelter frenzy of the late 1970s to appear in a handful of Canadian genre films. Though far from his most celebrated roles, Canuxploitation will always remember Mr. Borgnine in two of the better Canadian films of the period–Harvey Hart’s gun paranoia parable SHOOT (1976) and the violent crime thriller SUNDAY IN THE COUNTRY (1974). And, um, he appeared in underwater sci-fi spectacle THE NEPTUNE FACTOR (1973) too.

 

2

CanFilm Five: Author and Canadian Film and TV Critic D.K. Latta — Part 2

“CanFilm Five” is the Canuxploitation blog’s ongoing guest column, which brings together prominent filmmakers, bloggers, critics and programmers to discuss their most loved offbeat Canadian films.

The Masked Movie Critic, otherwise known as D.K. Latta (or is that the other way around?) is a sometimes writer of science fiction and of non-fiction, and a self appointed (and strangely self-important) commentator about, and opiner on, Canadian film & TV and has been for years. His website The Great Canadian Guide to the Movies (& TV) contains capsule reviews of literally thousands of Canadian movies and TV series and, when it started in the late 1990s, boasted it was the most extensive English-language Canadian site of its kind on or off the web. Not that there was a lot of competition for that particular bragging right. It’s probably less so now but, hey, he still likes it. It is also associated with his blog — Pulp and Dagger Blog — which is intended to cover a broader range of movie, TV and pop cultural topics, and does…but still tends to focus a lot on Canadian films and TV.

D.K. contributed two excellent lists–this earlier one on Canadian modes of movie mayhem  and this one on everyone’s favourite Canadian character actor, Michael Ironside!

Michael Ironside has become one of Canada’s most enduring exports. And has attained that singular distinction of arguably being a “cult” actor. Sure, any actor would love to be a matinee idol or to have a few Oscars under his belt. But the “cult” actor is, in his way, perhaps a more stalwart figure — a recognizable face to some, a vaguely recognized name to others…and an icon to many. He may not always appear in the best movies — indeed, “cult” actors are often usually described as being better than their material — and often in genre films of sci-fi, action and horror. But that’s kind of their appeal: their lack of pretension. They come. They do their job. And we love ‘em for it. And if you can tap into that vein successfully, you can look forward to a long career. Ironside himself once commented that in an industry where most actors were unemployed, most of the time…he’s worked steadily for years. Wonder if Ryan Reynolds or Ryan Gosling will be able to say the same a few decades down the line?

But Ironside’s roles have often been dictated by his distinctive presence and demeanour. It’s not that he has a face only a mother could love — it’s not like he’s ugly or anything — merely that he has a face only a mother wouldn’t be very, very scared of. And with a growling voice and the perfect surname to go with it! And so whether playing heroes or villains, Ironside is usually cast as the tough guy: the murderous killer, or the gruff anti-hero. But there’s more to his career than that! So let’s look at some of Michael Ironside’s more unusual roles.

SCANNERS (1983)
Okay, yeah, this is very much what you’d expect from him. But as probably his first major role, the one that put him on the cinematic map, it’s worth starting with. Ironside had already paid his dues in Canadian film with TV guest spots, and movie bit parts, and grunt work (on the movie NOTHING PERSONAL, he had a bit part as a motorcycle cop…and behind the scenes was, according to him, doing the laundry of the film’s star, Donald Sutherland!) by the time he was cast as the telepathic villain in David Cronenberg’s gory milestone — the movie that, arguably, helped take Cronenberg out of the ghetto of cult fandom and into the mainstream.

But now let’s consider some of his atypical roles:

… Continue Reading

0

Upcoming Screenings: July 2012

While many of us discovered Canuxploitation films through late night TV screenings and VHS rentals, there’s still something special about catching a locally produced B-movie classic in the theatre alongside other Canadian film fans. Here’s our monthly update featuring upcoming classic Canadian cinema screenings. Want your screening listed? Contact us.

TUCKER & DALE VS EVIL
July 12 @ 7pm
Rickshaw Theatre, Vancouver
A double bill with FRIDAY THE 13TH (1980), presented by Shivers.

THE FLY
July 27 @ 11:15 and July 29 @ 8:15
Mayfair Theatre, Ottawa
Cronenberg’s icky remake buzzes around for a return engagement in the nation’s capital.  More info here.

0

CanFilm Five: Author and Canadian Film and TV Critic D.K. Latta — Part 1

“CanFilm Five” is the Canuxploitation blog’s ongoing guest column, which brings together prominent filmmakers, bloggers, critics and programmers to discuss their most loved offbeat Canadian films.

The Masked Movie Critic, otherwise known as D.K. Latta (or is that the other way around?) is a sometimes writer of science fiction and of non-fiction, and a self appointed (and strangely self-important) commentator about, and opiner on, Canadian film & TV and has been for years. His website The Great Canadian Guide to the Movies (& TV) contains capsule reviews of literally thousands of Canadian movies and TV series and, when it started in the late 1990s, boasted it was the most extensive English-language Canadian site of its kind on or off the web. Not that there was a lot of competition for that particular bragging right. It’s probably less so now but, hey, he still likes it. It is also associated with his blog — Pulp and Dagger Blog — which is intended to cover a broader range of movie, TV and pop cultural topics, and does…but still tends to focus a lot on Canadian films and TV.

D.K. contributed two excellent lists–this one, and a second one we will be posting shortly. D.K. sez:

Instead of focusing on a best or greatest movie Top 5 list, I thought maybe I’d connect some films — some good, some bad, some indifferent — by their very Canadian modes of mayhem. Yes, Canada may be the land of “Peace, Order and Good Government” but sometimes it has provided a forum for some singularly Canadian forms of murder…or at least, wilful violence. Since it’s a top 5, I’ve had to make choices, just narrowly excluding GINA and its grisly snowplough death, or the creepy wendigo in GHOSTKEEPER. And I’m sure BON COP, BAD COP could fill up half this list by itself. Which brings us to:

TEKWAR (1994)
William Shatner, in collaboration with Ron Goulart, wrote a series of TEKWAR sci-fi novels that were turned into four TV movies, and then became a short-lived TV series. The novels and the TV series were explicitly set in a future United States but, interestingly, in the TV movies it’s a more ambiguous North American setting. In the first — and the best — of the movies, called simply TEKWAR, a future-era private eye (played by Greg Evigan) investigates a missing scientist’s disappearance. In one scene, the villains fear he’s getting too close to the trail and send a killer android after him — a hockey player android that attacks him at a skating rink.

SHADOW OF THE WOLF (1992)
In this film, Lou Diamond Phillips and Jennifer Tilly play a couple of star crossed1930s era Inuit lovers on the run from both their tribe and the white man. An attempt at a big budget spectacle of the kind Canada rarely tries anymore (and maybe this film’s poor box office partly led to that) in one memorable scene their igloo is attacked by a ravenous…polar bear! (“Crunchy on the outside, soft and chewy on the inside,” as a polar bear described igloos in an old Far Side comic strip). Not the easiest beasties to train, nor much call for them in movies set a little farther south, polar bear attack isn’t exactly one of Hollywood’s more common cliches!

… Continue Reading

Pages ... 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38