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Happy Holidays from Canuxploitation!

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Motion Picture Purgatory: FAST COMPANY (1979)

Rick Trembles is back with another exclusive Motion Picture Purgatory review. David Cronenberg may now be one of the country’s most celebrated directors, but much of his past work remains rarely seen by real champions of Canadian film. Of all his work, 1979’s FAST COMPANY may be his most obscure effort, and this time Rick takes a look at the film that takes a break from the diseased horror of his other 1970s and early ’80s work for some surprisingly straight-forward drag racing thrills.

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The First Bank of Toronto

A little pre-Christmas cheer spotted on the Vintage Toronto Facebook group:

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Motion Picture Purgatory: ILSA, TIGRESS OF SIBERIA (1977)

Another exclusive Motion Picture Purgatory review from Rick Trembles. This time Rick turns his attention on the mind-control mafia action thriller ILSA, TIGRESS OF SIBERIA, in which Dyanne Thorne reprises her iconic role as the dour dominatrix who arrives in Quebec to take over the brothel biz. Shot in Montreal by Cinepix mainstay Jean LaFleur, Rick takes a look at the only ILSA instalment that we can truly call 100% Canadian:

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Blizzard of Gore: A Q&A With Blood in the Snow Programmer Kelly Michael Stewart

While it’s becoming more common to see retrospective screenings of classic Canadian horror and cult films, the options for seeing contemporary Canadian horror in a theatre setting are few and far between. Fright Nights film programmer and Fangoria writer Kelly Michael Stewart is trying to change that with his latest screening series, The Blood in the Snow Canadian Film Festival. This three-day festival, happening this weekend at the Projection Booth-East, celebrates the best of today’s Canadian horror filmmaking, and will feature many directors and cast members in attendance. More details and advance tickets are available online. To get the lowdown on this new series, we talked to Kelly about getting local recognition for our homegrown talent, the importance of seeing these films in a theatre, and why Toronto is about to explode as a horror film capital of North America.

Why did you decide to start this series?

The Blood in the Snow Canadian Film Festival evolved out of my monthly Fright Nights film series that I’ve been hosting and programming at the Projection Booth for the past year. Fright Nights focuses on all types of horror films, but there has been amazing amount of genre/horror filmmaking to come out of Canada in the past few years. The feedback I received from filmmakers was that they were getting plenty of attention all around the world, but that they tended to be overlooked by the Canadian film festivals. This was interesting to me, because whenever I showed a Canadian film at Fright Nights it always drew bigger crowds than my non-Canadian programming.

So Blood in the Snow really came about from seeing a large hole in the marketplace that needed to be filled. Toronto in particular is a hotbed for horror talent right now. It reminds me very much of the Seattle music scene 20 years ago where it feels like things are about to explode.


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